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Gorilla Glass To Be Used In The New Ford GT


Ford GT 2016 2

The upcoming Ford GT will feature many firsts to this platform, but one of the most recent announcements is the type of glass this supercar will be produced with. Cornering (who are the makers of Gorilla Glass, featured in most phones today) partnered with Ford to develop both the front windshield and engine cover glass on the new GT. 


Ford's goal is to reduce as much weight as possible and provide the best power to weight ratio out there. Not just best in class weight, but the best power to weight ratio "of any car on the market". A pretty bold statement made by Jamal Hameedi who is the chief engineer at Ford Performance. 


The new innovative glass will save 12lbs in total compared to standard automotive glass. Which doesn't sound all that impressive to some, but when trying to save weight in a ultra high performance car every pound counts. This weight savings is achieved by reducing the glass thickness by 35 to 50%. This lighter product helps lower the vehicle's center of gravity for improved handling. 


To test this new product for durability, Ford subjected the panel to a variety of impact tests using various projectiles, such as rocks and stones, in addition to performance during rough road conditions and rollovers. Although the GT is the first production car to introduce this new technology, this product made it's debut when Ford and Cornering co-created a prototype vehicle called the Fusion MMLV (Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle) where the glass was used in place of the front windshield and side windows of the car further reducing overall glass weight by more than 30%.


This new step in glass technology carries on a tradition of multiple industries uniting toward the next generation of technology and is in keeping with the spirit of Henry Ford, who in addition to being a pioneer in industrial and manufacturing engineering, is also credited for the development and implementation of laminated safety glass as an automobile windshield in 1919.


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